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Cat Breeds that Shed the Most

You’ve probably ended up on this page not because you’re looking for a cat that sheds a lot but a list of moggies to cross off your list. Okay, we’re here to help! These include the Siberian, the Ragdoll and the Norwegian Forest Cat. You’ll find the complete list at the end of this article.

Cat Hair Allergy

A cat hair allergy is the most common reason why someone might want to avoid cat breeds that shed a lot. Unfortunately, even a few hairs are enough to cause reactions such as red eyes and sneezing. The problem is actually the saliva clinging to the hair. Our cat hair allergy article will explain further.

I Don’t Want Pet Hair in My Home!

How much hair is “too much” always depends on the person and their personal sensitivity. Just a handful is enough to make one person completely break down while someone else would just shrug their shoulders or not even notice. People also constantly lose our hair. And skin cells. It’s completely normal.

If you’re not sure whether you could deal with cat hair, take a closer look at your friends’ houses that have cats. Look at their sofa, clothes and carpets. Even if they regularly clean and vacuum, you’ll still see hair. How do you feel about that?

Cats with Long Fur Shed More

That’s a myth but one that’s widely accepted. Long-haired and short-haired cats shed their hair - just like us humans do. But because the longer hairs are quite a bit longer, they’re more noticeable. They’re simply easier to see than short hairs. Which cats shed more or less isn’t a question of fur length but breed. There can also be health reasons.

Does the Smell of Cat Hair Bother You?

There are many reasons why a cat might smell from time to time. If there’s no infection, fungus, fleas or similar to blame, then the problem is probably the hair that has gotten dirty as the cat was using the litter tray. This is common with cats that have long coats. Many owners trim the fur in the affected areas.

Cat breeds that shed the most: