Pet Names Based on Mayan Gods

There are many gods in the mysterious Mayan culture. Here, you’ll find a list of lovely gods’ names and their meanings.

The names of Mayan gods are much easier to pronounce than the names of Aztec gods. Still, you might still need a little practice. But you’ll end up with a great name that you won’t hear everywhere else.

Maya god Quetzalcoatl Maya god Quetzalcoatl - Illustration: Charis Estelle/Shutterstock

Mayan Language

The Mayan language looks like it’s full of tongue twisters. Around 6 million people speak it today in Mexico and Guatemala. There are also a few words we use that come from the Mayan language. Like the word hurricane. This comes from the Mayan god Huracán. He was the god of the wind, storms and fire. The word “sic” means tobacco and “sicar” means “to smoke tobacco leaves”. That’s where the word cigar comes from.

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GodJob
Awilix Goddess of the moon and the night
Cabracán God of mountains and earthquakes
Camazotz Bat god
Chaac God of storms and rain
Chilan Priest
Ek Chuah Patron god of warriors and merchants
Gukumatz Feathered Snake god and creator
Hunabku „God of the gods“
Hunahau God of death and the underworld
Huracán God of stars (at first), God of wind, storm and fire
Itzamná Founder of the Maya culture; „Father of wisdom“
Ixchel Goddes of earth and moon
Ixtab Goddess of Suicide
Kinich Ahau Solar deity
Kukulkan Feathered Serpent; similar to the aztec Quetzalcoatl
Xaman Ek God of the polar star, God of travelers and merchants
Yum Kaax God of the woods, of wild nature, and of the hunt
Zipacná „Creator of the mountains“
Animalistic Gods and People

In Mayan culture, lots of gods had an animal in their name or looked like animals. The Mayans also had people that turned into animals. They were healers, messengers, poets, writers, musicians and artists. In the Mayan people’s holy book, the great white pelican and the great white coati were healers. Owls were often messengers. The howler monkey was a writer and artist. The patron of the new year was an opossum.

Quetzal bird Quetzal bird - Photo: Wollertz/Shutterstock

• Gukumatz (pronounced: kookoo-mats) and
• Kukulkan (pronounced: kookool kan)

But let’s be serious: Gukumatz would be a perfect name for a bird. It even sounds like “coo coo”. For the Mayans in Guatemala, Gukumatz was a feathered serpent god. The Mayans on the Yucatán peninsula in Mexico had a feathered serpent god. There, he was called Kukulkan. He was also the god of the four elements, embodied by animals and plants (air = vulture, fire = lizard, earth = corn, water = fish). The Aztecs also had a similar god, who they called Quetzalcoatl in their language. In all three cases, the name is based on a colorful bird: the quetzal. The bird is even the symbol of Guatemala to this day. And the currency in Guatemala? Also called the quetzal.

• Chaac (pronounced: tshaahk)

Chaac was the god of the rain, thunder, fertility and agriculture. He is often depicted with the scales of a reptile, an upward pointing nose and fangs. His messengers were frogs, toads and turtles. So if you find a frog in your pond, you could call it Chaac. But be careful: it might rain all summer long, because frogs and toads symbolize rain (just kidding).

• Awilix (pronounced: ah weel ish)

Awilix could be a great name for a bird. In the Mayan language, “kwilix” or “wilix” means “swallow”. As the moon goddess, Awilix is connected to this animal. She was also the goddess of the night, and closely linked to the jaguar. So it might be a good idea for a cute cat with a spotted coat?

• Camazotz (pronounced kama sots)

The bat god Camazotz stands for the night, death and the victim. “Kame” means death and “sotz” bat.

• Ixchel (pronounced: ish tshel)

Ixchel, goddess of the moon and fertility, is often depicted as an old woman with jaguar ears. She was the protector of water and rainbows. Maybe, just like a jaguar, your cat has a spotted coat or isn’t as scared of water as other cats? Maybe this name would be a great fit. It’s definitely not the easiest to say.

Maya god Quetzalcoatl Maya god Quetzalcoatl - Illustration: Charis Estelle/Shutterstock